~Silent Transformations: Ecological Destruction as Spiritual Practice~

Announcing a new series of study:  Silent Transformations: Ecological Destruction as Spiritual Practice

A series tied to the seasons. Join us on February 2nd (9am-4pm) for our first Silent Transformations day of practice led by Adam Lobel, Michelle King, and Fitzhugh Shaw. You can find more information about our February 2nd winter: loving what we are losing gathering and register here.

Silent Transformations: A Seasonal Exploration of Climate Disruption as a Spiritual Practice of Gratitude

Winter: Dormancy. Resting into the situation. Meditation to settle, open, and feel the reality of our natural systems. We will tell stories about our experience of ecological change and express four different spiritual-psychological approaches to work with the emotions and reactions. We will spend time alone outside in the cold (if it is cold), and allow the winter season to be one of our teachers. We will learn from traditional agricultural practices for the winter and what they can tell us about natural systems and their disruption. We will explore the theme of loving what we are losing in this context.

Spring: Budding. Possibility. Sensuality. Small, potent actions. After resting into the reality of the ecological and climate crisis, what wants to emerge from us, out of our growing gratitude? What is the difference between a fresh sprout and habitual repetition of patterns? How is our impact on the ecosystem connected with emergence vs. habitual, reactive patterns? We will spend time alone outside, and allow the spring season to be one of our teachers. We will learn from traditional agricultural practices for the spring and what they can tell us about natural systems and their disruption. We will explore the theme of loving what we are losing in this context.

Summer: Growth and Fruit. Imagination. What in us wants to grow, develop, and expand from love and gratitude? How does this relate with the relentless pursuit of growth, the exploitation of the planet, and the carbon pollution? We will spend time alone outside, and allow the summer heat to be one of our teachers. We will learn from traditional agricultural practices for the summer and what they can tell us about natural systems and their disruption. We will explore the theme of gratitude in this context.

Autumn: From fruit, to harvest, to decay. Loving richness, loss, deterioration, and decay. The passionate excess of harvest celebrations, bacchanalia, as an expression of both appreciation and abundance. Engaging meditations on ripe as well as decaying fruit, animals, and bodies. We will spend time alone outside, and allow the autumn to be one of our teachers. We will learn from traditional agricultural practices for the summer and what they can tell us about natural systems and their disruption. How is excessive, orgiastic communal festivity related to natural cycles and decay? Has our gratitude brought us to a place of true celebration as we lose the earth that we love and need?

 

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